The Bermuda Triangle

The Bermuda Triangle. The book contributed greatly to popularize the idea that the Bermuda Triangle is an area of ​​the Atlantic Ocean particularly prone to make ships and planes disappear. Over the years the book managed to sell some 20 million copies, several of which corresponded to the editions translated into some 30 languages.

In the work, Berlitz elaborated or tried several theories to try to explain the disappearances, although he chose to give credibility to those who have a natural cause. One of these theories states that the Bermuda Triangle would have been a by-product derived from the destruction of the mythical Atlantis on which the Greek philosopher Plato wrote.

In 1975, just one year after it was originally published, the book received a reply from Larry Kusche. In the work of the latter, entitled The Bermuda Triangle mystery: Solved ("The mystery of the Bermuda Triangle: Resolved"), Kusche cites errors in some of the reports on missing ships listed by Berlitz. According to Kusche, cited by James Randi in 1982, Berlitz's credibility "is so low that it is virtually non-existent". If Berlitz reported that a ship is red, the chances of it being of another color would be almost a certainty, it says things that are simply not true. that contradicts its mystery: A real estate salesman who operated in this way would end up in jail.

For its part, the London insurance company Lloyd's has determined that the Triangle in question is no more dangerous than any other region of the ocean, so it does not charge any special insurance rate to the insured vessels that travel through that area. The records of the United States Coast Guard confirm their assertion. In fact, the accounts of missing ships mentioned by Berlitz were prior to the publication of the book.

The first place where he had heard those stories was in his travel agency, wondering why his customers asked him to avoid flying over that region. The book served as the basis for a film released in 1978, which included the collaboration of Dr. J. Manson Valentine, who provided photographs and illustrations.