The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, an American author. First published on April 10, 1925, this story is set in New York City and Long Island during the summer of 1922.

This novel describes the period that Fitzgerald himself dubbed "The Jazz Age". Following the tension and chaos of World War I, during the 1920s, American society enjoyed unprecedented levels of prosperity as the economy soared. At the same time, the ban on selling and consuming alcohol mandated by "Eighteen Amendments to the United States", made millionaires avoid alcoholic drink makers and encourage an increase in organized crime. Even though Fitzgerald, like Nick Carraway in his novel, adores wealth and glamor at that time, he is very uncomfortable with uncontrolled materialism and the low morality that occurs.

The Great Gatsby was not very popular at the start of printing, selling just under 25,000 copies for the remaining 15 years of Fitzgerald's life.

Although the story has been adapted into Hollywood theater and film performances a year after publication, the story was forgotten during the period of depression and World War II. After being republished in 1945 and 1953, the novel was very in demand, and was sometimes seen as an American successful novel. The story in this novel is now a standard reading in American literature studies at high schools and universities around the world.