Adam's Rib

Adam's Rib is an American romantic feature film from 1949. Directed by George Cukor.

Story: Doris Attinger tries to shoot her faithless husband Warren, who cheats on her with Beryl Caighn. The Bonn couple learn about it the next morning from the newspaper. Adam Bonner is a prosecutor and his wife Amanda a defense lawyer. At the same time, a marriage dispute ensues over this story, as Amanda is convinced that a deceived wife does not receive the same justice after such an act as a man in a comparable situation. Adam must learn the same day that he is designated as a prosecutor to bring this case to court, and he immediately sees marital problems coming at him. Meanwhile, his wife Amanda struggles for the mandate. The marital dispute over emancipation the woman is now being tried in court. Amanda fights in court not only for the freedom of her client, but for equal rights of the woman in itself. Her marriage threatens to be destroyed. At the height of the trial, she ridicules the jurisdiction itself, including her husband Adam, who sees the law pulled in the dirt. He leaves Amanda, who now only meets her husband on court dates. Finally, Amanda wins the case, but seems to have lost her marriage. Only at a meeting with the tax consultant do they both realize that their relationship and what they have built up in life is more important than the political dispute and find each other again.

Background: Ehekrieg is one of the late classics of the Screwball comedy and next to The Woman, one of the most popular comedies of the pair Tracy/Hepburn, which also had a love story for decades in real life.

Criticism: "The second of the unique series of Cukor films, which were created between 1947 and 1953 in collaboration with the author team Ruth Gordon/Garson Kanin and above all a theme - mostly in the form of "sophisticated comedy" - treated: women's emancipation and Relationship of the sexes. Here, a progressive pair of lawyers vicariously leads the gender struggle before the barriers of the court. An intelligent plea for equality." - Encyclopedia of International Film.

Awards: The actress and author Ruth Gordon and her co-author Garson Kanin received in 1950 an Oscar nomination for their screenplay. Ruth Gordon later became world famous through Roman Polański's film Rosemary's Baby, for which she received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and through her starring role in the black comedy Harold and Maude. In 1992, Marriage War was included in the National Film Registry.

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